Football Gazette's Small College Football Blog

Don Hansen's Football Gazette Blog of information, comments, notes, and tidebits on Small College Football. NCAA 1-AA & Mid Major, Division II & Mid Major, Division III, NAIA, and NCCAA

Thursday, October 06, 2005

THIS WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL HISTORY: OCT. 3 - OCT. 9

MORRISTOWN, N.J., October 6, 2005 – As part of an ongoing series throughout the fall, This Week in College Football History takes a look back at some of college football’s landmark moments over the last 137 years.
Throughout the season, many of these items are depicted in a changing exhibit at the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind.

*If you choose to use this content in whole or in part, as a courtesy, please credit The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame.


Featured Moment

A Legend Bursts Onto the College Gridiron

October 6, 1923: Any debate about the greatest college running back of all-time must consider the legendary Harold “Red” Grange. Given the nickname “The Galloping Ghost” by noted writer Grantland Rice following a dominating performance against Michigan in 1924, Grange captivated the public with his breathtaking speed and elusiveness in the open field. He even appeared on the cover of Time Magazine on October 5, 1925.

But the legend of Red Grange really began on October 6, 1923, in his first collegiate football game against Nebraska. Grange punished the Cornhusker defense for touchdown runs of 50, 35 and 12 yards in a 24-7 Illini victory.
A charter member of the College Football Hall of Fame, Grange’s combined rushing total in high school, college and professionally would reach almost 34,000 yards.

Other Notable Moments to Occur This Week in College Football History:

October 3, 1987: In a game featuring the talent and personalities of
Michael Irvin, Deion Sanders and Leroy Butler, #3 Miami defeated #4 Florida State 26-25. Victory wasn’t ensured until the final minute, when a Florida State two-point conversion pass fell incomplete with :50 seconds to play.
The game featured sensational touchdown catches by Miami’s Irvin and Florida State’s Dexter Carter, and would springboard the Hurricanes to an undefeated season and the national championship.

October 6, 1973: Washington quarterback Chris Rowan throws for four
touchdowns passes in the fourth quarter against California. But it wasn’t enough as Cal beats the Huskies, 54-49.

October 6, 1990: The Colorado Buffaloes are given two second downs and
score as time expires on what people believe to be fourth down as they beat Missouri, 33-31. The Buffs need every one of those downs, as they roll to an 11-1-1 season and a share of the national championship.

October 7, 1916: Georgia Tech beats Cumberland, 220-0, a record score, a
week after Cumberland loses to Sewanee, 107-0.

October 7, 2000: Menlo’s Zamir Amin passes for 723 yards in a game against
Cal Lutheran, the second-highest single game total in NCAA history.

October 9, 2004: The USC Trojans, AP national champions in 2003, avenge
their only loss the previous season by beating California, 23-17, using a goal-line stand to stop the Bears from taking the lead late in the fourth quarter. The Trojans repeat as national champions later that season and currently hold a 26-game winning streak, the nation’s longest.

With 119 chapters and over 10,000 members nationwide, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame, a non-profit educational organization, runs programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in America’s young people.
NFF programs include the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind., Play It Smart, The NFF Center for Youth Development Through Sport at Springfield College (Mass.), the NFL-NFF Coaching Academy, and annual scholarships of nearly $1 million for college and high school scholar-athletes.

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NFF Contact
Chris Caputo.....Communications Assistant
22 Maple Ave.
Morristown, NJ 07960
973.829.1933
973.829.1737 (fax)
www.footballfoundation.org



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